Saturday, December 21, 2013

Shipping container house


This enterprising gal has converted a shipping container into an abode. She used a jigsaw to cut the openings. I really like looking at these sort of videos and am attracted to the little house idea. I don't know if I would like it, though. Might be better as a week-end get-away.

29 comments:

Sixty Grit said...

A small place is nice - easier to clean. I have several sheds that would make nice small houses, but I prefer a bit more space for me and my animals.

This is a subject that has been getting a lot of press lately - I wonder why that is?

Lem said...

Poor with style.

deborah said...

Poor with style...that's my goal :)

Sixty, I think it's a thing with some personality types. Think Walden.

It is so dreary to shop at Walmart when you have to get a ton of crap. Food and things. I don't want to be a grinch, but it can be maddening.

And then when I go to donate, I say, wow, all that money wasted.

Sixty Grit said...

I get the drive for Walden, minimalism is something I like to think I pursue, and I really am not big on materialism, but I think there is an underlying theme to all the media stories these days about living in tiny boxes.

It's kind of the mirror image of the old American dream - you know - that you could own a house with a fence and a dog in the suburbs. Now it is you can live in something slightly larger than a prison cell, maybe in a tower in the city, and damn it, be happy because that's all you're ever going to get, drone, shut up.

It seems like a fundamental shift in culture - no more aspirations, freedom - meh, it's over-rated. Do not speak your mind or you will be destroyed. Toe the line, worship the state, pay through the nose and do not complain, except about unequal outcome, regardless of effort or talent.

Perhaps I am reading too much into this. Or not...

deborah said...

I see it more as withdrawing from materialism, mass culture, and mega-government. Simplify, simplify.

Are our overlords managing us even unto down-sizing!?

Sixty Grit said...

Bloomburg approves!

It's a conditioning thing. If the rich can be crammed into tiny footprints, will the poor be far behind?

Who know that cages led to mental dysfunction?

Our betters refuse to follow leaders.

Let the Hunger Games begin!

Sixty Grit said...

"Know"? Make that "knew". Long day.

Sixty Grit said...

Just another example I have seen in the last few days.

It's a trend, I tells ya!

Unknown said...

I like the concept of simplification and purging our lives of the things we don't really need. That said, I'd have a difficult time living in a small box.

My dream home isn't terribly small, but it's not a mansion. (mansions- yuck) It would be the Goldie locks of homes with tasteful useful furniture and hardly any knickknacks or things. I hate dusting.

Anyway -I'm curious about this woman's land situation. No mention at all about the land.

Sixty Grit said...

Funny, that, right? Usually the tiny homes on wheels (tornado targets?) are parked on land owned by friends or relatives. Sometimes the builder/owner puts the thing on their own land, but ultimately, these things are nothing more than upscale mobile homes.

I need a foundation. Brick walls are nice, too.

But you can park your mini-home on my land any time you want, debs. ;^)

Unknown said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
deborah said...

Did you just make me read-skim four articles? Over all, I don't think there is a lefty agenda toward small space. I think it is more of a natural human trend. But like April, going teeny-tiny is not all that, either. I was recently looking at a top floor apartment in an old-fashioned house (online). Probably about 900 sq. ft. I thought, what would be the point?

Exactly, April. I'm wondering about her land use, her water source and disposal, and if her daughter is getting enough socialization (probably). Is she home schooled?

deborah said...

Yes, foundations are nice. I'm a worry wart, and don't want to be carried away in a tornado.

Unknown said...

I like that she made choices outside of the mainstream and used resources creatively.
She admits there are drawbacks to her choices. The main benefit is more time and less demands for the extra work it would take to take on the bills & high rent payments.

How is the toilet hooked up?

and yes sixty - foundations are nice.

Unknown said...

oops. had to fix some things. I'm in need of constant fixer-uppering.

Unknown said...

The daughter appears to have plenty of friends.

but yeah- Deborah- I'm just curious if she has access to city sewer or is she on septic - and how did that all work out?

deborah said...

Sixty, upon reflection, of course it's about the smaller footprint for some, esp. the ones in the high rises. The joke will be on them when they get cabin fever and have to sell. Eventually the co-op will be knocking down walls. But still there is a great need by many to stop the madness.

Yes, April, I want answers!

Sixty Grit said...

The woman who claims to have built her own trailer home uses a composting toilet.

Wood chips are involved.

I used to give my wood chips to a woman who had a composting toilet.

I prefer plumbing.

AllenS said...

If a person didn't have a lot of extra money, and you wanted to have a little cabin/getaway place on the lake up-nort, this would be perfect. That way if relatives or not-so-good-of friends wanted to come with, you could say: "Nope, don't have the room."

Aridog said...

Bah humbug. Sorry, the cynic in me again says bullshit on this story. 1.) she does not have a self-contained house in one container...she built two structures one in a container and the other on a trailer. 2.) The trailer house container is her bedroom, and private space, and it is several feet away from the container. In short, the "footprint" over all is much larger than the two components, which must be considered part of the whole of structures, land used, etc. 3.) No mention of how "the sink" was plumbed, just mentioned in passing. So, yeah, how is the water, sewage, electricity, heat fuel, and such handled? On whose land? Does she have a car or truck..where is it parked?

PS: New Yorkers might not have the car issue, but this lady living in BFE sure would.

bagoh20 said...

Insufficiently dedicated to principle. True minimalism is called homelessness, or if you get fancy, a tent. For kids, you get a babysitting job, and the toilets at McDonald's are cleaned daily by your free janitor service. That's true thinking outside the box, or container, if you will.

AllenS said...

A shopping cart + refrigerator cardboard box + roll of duct tape, and there you go. Mobile home for the poor.

chickelit said...

Is it stackable?

Evi L. Bloggerlady said...

Here is an alternative.

This too.

Aridog said...

I must note that only AllenS's layout above covers the issues of water and sewage and land cost. Public facilities all, using infrastructure built by others.

All those mobile and/or permanent looking items are cute, but require permits, licensing (for the trailer or to build if on land), power hook ups, space rentals, possible sewage and water hook ups, etc..none of which are free or even low cost.

An analogy is like the one for yachting sailboats ... the cost of the boat is the least of it...it's the rigging & slip access that will bankrupt you.

Aridog said...

Bagoh20's works, too...if you live in a nice warm hospitable climate. Otherwise, you're living like AllenS's example.

deborah said...

Sixty also linked to Allen's example :) It'a really well done, but... There doesn't seem that big a reason to go so small. More of a kind of show-offmanship. I can did the small thing on wheels for a get-away.

Allen, you remind me of an old joke: a old timer got a letter from some female relatives who said they were coming for a visit. They came, he served them a meal. They said, let us help with the dishes. He said that's alright, and called the dogs to lick clean the dishes. The ladies did not spend the night.

deborah said...

Sixty, I'll take your word that that's a composting toilet. How does she fill the tub? Is that water heater solar or electric?

Yeah, Ari, she's def in BFE.

Remember Dadvocate? He had a good idea. Just buy a cheap house and live frugally.


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