Sunday, March 31, 2019

Rice cultivation

No more little old grandmas completely bent over from a lifetime working the rice fields.

They start out the same way as microgreens then transplanted into rice paddies.



8 comments:

AllenS said...

That ain't the way that I remember it being done.

Evi L. Bloggerlady said...

Welcome to California!

Amartel said...

I went hiking up in the Mendocino National Forest once. It's in Northern California between the central valley and the coast. Anyway, I got far enough up where I could see east over the little ridges of the hill country that separates the mountains from the valley and all I could see in the central valley was the light reflecting off all the enormous rice fields. I had no idea there were so many there! (Although all those big rice silos off I-5 probably should have been a clue!)

Chip Ahoy said...

This is Japan.

I didn't mention that because I thought you could tell by everyone being Japanese and the equipment being so small.

Americans don't mess around with dinky equipment like this.

rhhardin said...

Japan doesn't allow rice imports, as far as I know. That means the Japanese only compete with each other, not Americans.

The story in Japan is that American rice is no good. Japanese visiting America are always surprised by how good American rice is.

Sixty Grit said...

Japan protects its rice farmers by placing prohibitive tariffs on imported rice. They have long prided themselves on being self-sufficient when it comes to their dietary staple. Do they actually import rice and then stick it in warehouses in Tokyo? Stories vary.

Trooper York said...

I remember when John Rice was a umpire crew chief every weekend at Yankee Stadium.

We used to chant "What comes out of a Chinaman's ass!"

We would get arrested for a hate crime today!

Amartel said...

Yeah I figured this in the video wasn’t USA rice by the size of the equipment. I once had a Central Valley case involving a tomato harvester injury. I went out to see the harvester and the thing was literally the size of a house.