Monday, March 1, 2021

O Brave New Word

 

From  Curmudgeon's Corner, via AceOfSpades.

9 comments:

ndspinelli said...

Norm Crosby and Professor Irwin Corey made millions w/ this.

The Dude said...

Well, for all intense and porpoises that is true...

KCFleming said...

The Bowery Boys were pretty good at this, too.

The Dude said...

I just went to the bank. There was a piece of paper taped to the door and it said they have a new "regime" for dealing with ChinkFlu. I think they meant to write "regimen" but dey ignant. Best not to point that out too often.

Trooper York said...

Hey dude thank God you posted. I was getting worried. Great post.

chickelit said...

I never use that word; I use malapropism. Like Sixty, these can be fun and done on porpoise.

MamaM said...

Hard to pick a fave in this collection, and harder still to discern and ferret out all the discrepancies on the first passover. Garnering with a single gander was virtuously impossible to accomplish, with additional concecration and focus required.

On Gander:Besides being the proper name for a male goose and a slang word for silly man, the word gander also shows up in the idiom "take a gander." The slang sense of gander comes from the meaning recorded in 1886, to take a long look by craning one's neck like a goose, or wander foolishly (again, like a goose).

Here's to Gandering and Garnering in the Den of Levity! And where did this post take my craning and gandering neck today? To this:

What is a Ninnyhammer?

What does Ultracrepidarian mean?

What does Pilgarlic mean

What is Darkle?

What does Neddy mean?


All of which rose to float above the surface of this post like a scepter from the single entry of "mumpsimius", none of which was asked for or sought.

Mumpsimus said...

I like "ultracrepidarian" and the story behind it, MamaM. Thanks.

The Dude said...

If you look up "pilgaric" Yul be sorry, just sayin'.