Monday, July 25, 2016

"Southern California fire destroys 18 home; dozens at risk"

APA massive wildfire destroyed at least 18 homes and threatened 1,500 more Sunday as flames churned through tinder-dry canyons north of Los Angeles where authorities found a burned body in a neighborhood.

Planes and helicopters dropped water and retardant on the blaze that has blackened more than 34 square miles of brush on ridgelines near the city of Santa Clarita and the Angeles National Forest. About 300 miles up the coast, crews were battling another blaze spanning 16 square miles north of the majestic Big Sur region.

Crews faced another day of hot weather, low humidity and high winds that could once again fan the fires’ explosive growth. Shifting winds sent smoke away from greater Los Angeles and into desert communities, where residents were warned about poor air quality.

16 comments:

edutcher said...

I know when it gets dry out there, that brush will go up of its own will.

Methadras said...

a lot of these so cal fires are due BLM failing to clear old growth brush for eco pseudo science reasons.

Sixty Grit said...

Man, those BLM types cause trouble wherever they go!

Lem said...

I hope this is no where near our friend bags.

AllenS said...

I remember a long time ago, reading about when Cortez first entered now what is called California, he noted very few Indians living there. The reason should be obvious.

Trooper York said...

I hope all our Cali people like bags, DBQ and chickenlittle are safe.

At least bags has all those Mexicans to form a bucket brigade.

Stay safe my friends.

edutcher said...

AllenS said...

I remember a long time ago, reading about when Cortez first entered now what is called California, he noted very few Indians living there. The reason should be obvious.

That was Baja, I believe.

edutcher said...

Troop, I think oopsy's too far north for this to affect her.

Trooper York said...


AllenS said...

I remember a long time ago, reading about when Cortez first entered now what is called California, he noted very few Indians living there. The reason should be obvious.

Of course. There were too many Mexicans.

AllenS said...

Yes, Mexicans catch fire easily. Especially, after they've spent the day eating super burritos.

Evi L. Bloggerlady said...

old growth brush? Chaparel's cycle involves burning. More fires the better, it burns less hot

Methadras said...

Evi, that's normally true under a controlled burn, but this stuff has been around for 40 years or so and allowed to become very dense. Same with old growth forests, no proper cleaning.

Sixty Grit said...

If what I am reading is correct then Chip Ahoy should be in for some awesome sunsets.

chickelit said...

Blake probably lives the closest to this fire of the people we know. Same valley but still miles away.

Evi L. Bloggerlady said...

I agree Meth. I just laugh at the idea of 40 year old brush as "old growth." Old growth forests are 250 yrs or older. Trees that big and old rarely burn. Fires sweep by and just burn undergrowth. This chaparral is different, it's life cycle wants to burn. It's a powder keg waiting to explode.

Dust Bunny Queen said...

We are too far north as ed says to be affected by either the LA or now Big Sur fires. What we fear, here, is a build up of thunder heads and lightening fires or some dopey camper who starts a wild fire.

Fortunately...or unfortunately, the last few years of fires have cleared off much of the brush, manzanita and other slash on the floors of the forests and lava beds. And also very unfortunately have decimated many of the bigger trees. It will be decades for the area to recover.

Much of the surrounding area forests are government controlled and those areas are still not cleared of underbrush or thinned by removing the small spindly threes. Ripe for devastating crowning fires. Eco dopes. However, a good portions of the forests, surrounding where most people actually live, are privately owned and those lands have been routinely cleared and thinned and people have fire break zones around their areas. Guess which ones go up in flames and are devastated when the fires come? Guess. I dare you.

It is hot hot hot as well. Going to be 115 in the Sacramento valley floor the next few days. That is actually normal for the area though, so no big deal.