Friday, May 16, 2014

SunTrust Bank Cuts Ties With Benham Brothers Due to Conservative Beliefs

More progressive fascism.  It's horrible. 

The Benham brothers are Christians.  SunTrust Bank, for whom they have sold thousands of foreclosed homes, unexpectedly cut all business ties with them in a fifteen minute period because of the Benhams' religious beliefs.

This progressive fascism has to be fought against and stopped.

Article.

91 comments:

The Dude said...

Time for me to close my SunTrust accounts and let them know why.

Shouting Thomas said...

The denunciations and purges continue.

Remember when TOP said that liberalizing our attitudes toward gays would lead to more freedom?

What is has led to is 2% of the population tyrannize the majority.

It will only get worse.

Chip S. said...

This seems like a major unforced error. Was anybody really pushing for this?

I predict a walk-back by Monday, to be followed by Gay Rage, then a major donation to GLAAD.

I'm Full of Soup said...

If this is true, it is way over the top. It is a sad testament, like the VA fiasco, to how many of our biggest organizations seem to be haphazardly run.

I am struck by some of these Congressional hearings where they bring in the Dept Secretary and they don't seem to have even a rundimentary mgt report that is prepared monthly to track their primary tasks and responsibilities.

I suggest we demand each Cabinet Secretary publish a monthly productivity report on the internet? It is crazy that we don't already mandate that.

President-Mom-Jeans said...

I hope there is some major backlash against Sun Trust.

Chip S. said...

Hard to believe that there won't be a ferocious backlash, given that SunTrust mostly operates in the South.

Lydia said...

That didn't take long -- at the Charlotte Observer: Benham Real Estate says SunTrust listings restored:

"Benham Real Estate said late Friday that its property listings with SunTrust Banks had been restored – hours after the Concord-based realty company announced that the bank had pulled all of its property listings."

Rabel said...

I'm not sure I'm buying this as presented by Daily Caller.

Banks, and their mortgage businesses in particular, are expressly prohibited by federal law from discrimination based on religion.

If Sun Trust pulled the business because of the Benhams' religious views it has put itself in an untenable position. They're not that stupid, are they?

Rabel said...

And, per Lydia, somebody must have talked to a lawyer.

The Dude said...

Well, now what do I do with all the cash I just withdrew from my local branch?

I know - throw it up in the air, let the ceiling fan spread it around (just like Obama) then roll around in the pile. Naked.

Then go on the biggest coke-fueled, cigar smokin', single malt drinkin' binge I can sustain.

Gonna party like it's 2014!

I would ask who's in, but the answer might prove to be disturbing.

Trooper York said...

Yes they are. What makes you think they would not bow to the pressure that the gay lobby would exert. They try to do it again and again and again.

Sometimes they fail like in Chickfila and the Duck Dynasty guys. Sometimes they succeed like the Modzilla guy. Their ultimate goal is to destroy everyone that does not agree with them.

Regardless of your deeply held religious beliefs. It doesn't matter to them. If they could they would shut down the churches, temples, mosques and synagogues if they could.

Lydia said...

In that article I linked to above, SunTrust says it was a third-party vendor that handles some of its real estate business that did the dirty deed:

"Reached for comment, SunTrust said in a statement that it doesn’t 'make choices on suppliers nor base business decisions on political factors, nor do we direct our third-party vendors to do so.'

Last year, SunTrust consolidated the management of some of its residential real estate assets with a third-party vendor that contracts with Benham, the bank said in its statement. The bank did not identify the vendor, or say whether the vendor had discontinued a relationship with the Benham company.

SunTrust 'supports the rights of all Americans to fully exercise their freedoms granted under the Constitution, including those with respect to free speech and freedom of religion,' it said.

I'm Full of Soup said...

I must be crazy to think these Govt Drones would actually give a crap how their cabinets are managed and run. I tend to forget that they work in govt because they are mostly lazy, dumb asses.

Trooper York said...

If they could they would.

I'm Full of Soup said...

Sixty- you sound like you could be auditioning for a role on Justified.

Trooper York said...

They thought they could get away with it and when they got caught they all of sudden blamed somebody else.

You know that there is an executive at SunTrust who pushed this. There can be not doubt about it.

I am sure if you follow the paper trail you will find a Titus in the woodpile.

Rabel said...

Sixty, if I were you I would send all that cash to Meade and have him invest it in commodities futures for you. He has a Hillary-like talent for that sort of thing. Or so I've heard.

I'm sure he'd be glad to help out a friend.

Chip S. said...

If I were about to hand over some cash to anyone to invest for me, I'd tell 'em up front, "Just don't screw the pooch."

The Dude said...

I'm too real for Justified.

I would be walkin' all over the sets sayin' "That's a damn pepper tree, not a sweetgum" and "Get that damned eucalyptus outta my face, dude!", and I would keep it so real they would fire me quicker than Oceanside could be reduced to glowing embers.

Fo' rizzle!

chickelit said...

AJ Lynch said...
Sixty- you sound like you could be auditioning for a role on Justified.

That simile will not make Sixty smile.

chickelit said...

Sixty is an "arborealist."

The Dude said...

Say it again, my fine feathered brother.

Got any trees left out your way? We got over 4 inches of rain here yesterday - was thinkin' that might put a damper (ouch) on those fires.

Trooper York said...

Sixty just likes to inspect your wood.

chickelit said...

@Sixty: The sky is raining fertilizer. There is a fine coating of potassium-rich ash on everything.

Michael Haz said...

@Rabel - Banks are HIGHLY regulated by the FedGov. Just a few words from a bank regulator can have a big impact.

The Dude said...

Ash is better than snow, at least in my experience in California.

What is the current status of the fires there?

bagoh20 said...

WTF? I have the armored truck half filled, and now you say "nevermind".

I got a great buzz just from the dust coming off all that cash!

Or maybe it's just because:

IT'S FRIDAY!!!

chickelit said...

@Sixty: the danger remains high as it's currently in the high 90s and breezy.

There is some containment.

The fires seem to die out each night and then restart in the morning. Lots of choppers flying around picking up water: link

The Dude said...

Scary stuff.

I am with the late Phil Hartman - "Fire bad!"

Trooper York said...

I thought Phil Hartman said;

"Blond wife bad!"

edutcher said...

Sounds like the Benhams did SunTrust a lot of good.

We used to call what sunTrust did cutting off your nose to spite your face.

Still fits.

President-Mom-Jeans said...

I hope there is some major backlash against Sun Trust.

Lydia said...

That didn't take long -- at the Charlotte Observer: Benham Real Estate says SunTrust listings restored:

Sixty Grit said...

Well, now what do I do with all the cash I just withdrew from my local branch?

Find some more trustworthy people with whom to do business.

IOW, don't let them off the hook.

Trooper York said...

I am sure if you follow the paper trail you will find a Titus in the woodpile.

Interesting turn of phrase.

I thought Phil Hartman said;

"Blond wife bad!"


Depends on where you are.

Unknown said...

Yay inland bodies of water!

The Dude said...

I know! We used to vacation at the Islets of Langerhans when I was younger. Very scenic.

Trooper York said...

Well Phil Hartman was inside a chalk outline. Just sayn'

The Dude said...

Hey - in all the excitement, what with walkin' around town with giant envelopes full of bills and a gun in every hand, I missed the fact that Haz posted this - welcome back, Hazman. I tried to post at your website but Epic won't let me. Bad Epic, bad.

But welcome home safe and sound - hope you post some pictures and stories of your journey.

The Key West post made me laugh. You pretty much nailed it - although the Audobon house is nice, what with the folio and all.

When I was there in '76 there was a hawk living in a tree there that would swoop down and eat palmetto bugs that the tour guides would toss out for it. Very cool.

Michael Haz said...

Thanks, Sixty. I'm glad that you enjoyed my scribbling. We'll be back on the road soon and I'll write some more.

Mrs. Haz likes Key West. Dang. She sez she'd be happy in a 600 SF place there.

That'd be the size of her current closet, so there is an element of doubt. A small element.

AllenS said...

I don't even go to church, and this shit pissed me off to no end,

The Dude said...

I really like the South Carolina Low Country - that feels like home to me, and the barrier islands of NC, and the Keys, and the Atlantic coast side of FLA, the Gulf coast a bit less due to the smaller waves, but every time I think about moving to such a place I check the elevation above MSL and compare that number to recorded storm surges that pile up in front of hurricanes. When the highest point on an island is less than a known storm surge, well, I'll pass.

That, combined with choke points like miles of bridges over the ocean, the ICW, and so on makes me seek refuge a bit further inland.

Even a storm like yesterday's, which dumped billions of gallons of water in my county has to be considered, when one wants to live in a van, down by the river. Sometimes the river meets you half way.

Michael Haz said...

Stilt homes, Sixty. Think stilt homes.

You can carve the stilts.

The Dude said...

LOL! Combine my love of Tlingit totem long houses made of carved cedar with a view of the Atlantic ocean. I could become as stilted as my dwelling!

*checks lottery ticket* - nope, one story brick rancher will have to do for now...

Icepick said...

Haz, she's thinking the whole home will be the closet and you'll just live out on the patio. Go back in July before going with that plan.

And sorry you didn't make it to Ruth Ann's.

chickelit said...

Sixty Grit said...
I know! We used to vacation at the Islets of Langerhans when I was younger. Very scenic.

Don't they make good a single malt there?

Scotch really is a panacrea.

chickelit said...

If Ritmo were here, he'd call that joke "cheesy."

chickelit said...

If Ruth Anne were here, she'd out-pun me.

Michael Haz said...

Icepick - not seeing the assembled good people at Ruth Anne's was a big disappointment! We tried to work it into previously made plans but couldn't get there. Plus, I needed to find a new tire.

Next time!

XRay said...

Hey, chick, I know there is no reason for there to be, but no hard feelings from last night I hope, and thanks for the sorry. I know I can be an ass at times.

As to the topic it looks as if the exact details of what may have transpired are murky at best. Though, the overall point of the post is still relevant.

As compare to the harassing of Professor Lennart Bengtsson. Leftists can't stand a fair fight, as they would likely win few.

Just shut up say they.

Fr Martin Fox said...

Standing with Jesus Christ is a good place to be, even if a lot of **** comes down on you.

The folks who have the whip-hand now won't always have it. They'll lose it super-fast.

Doesn't anyone read the Book of Revelation?

Aridog said...

Rabel said...

I'm sure he'd be glad to help out a friend.

:-))

Sixty Grit said...

Scary stuff ... "Fire bad!"

Only one thing scares me uncontrollably...and that is fire. I once walked in to a fire to convince a nice lady to leave before the roof collapsed on her....neighbors were sure I was drunk. I was. Never before and never again.

Michael Haz said...

Stilt homes, Sixty. Think stilt homes.

You do not want to know how many of those stilt places we had to bulldoze the shattered remnants of ... on hurrican responses to the North Carolina Outer Banks.

Titus said...

Father Fox you should consider focusing on your fat rather than the gay.

thanks.

tits.

Icepick said...

Titus is here for the requisite big gay snit.

Aridog said...

Hey is "Titus" even real? I have always presumed he was somebody's sock puppet. I can be wrong, but his posts seem such over weening nonsense most of the time. The gay thing is not new except to the youngish who look for attention by any means necessary.

chickelit said...

Ask Palladian about Titus, Ari. He's real.

Aridog said...

Chickenlittle...okay will do. I'm wrong a lot.

Chip Ahoy said...

I did read the Book of Revelations a couple of times and it revealed the contents of a highly disturbed mind. I am amazed they included the book and I am offended my copy has Jesus' words printed in red when any reader will note the change in voice completely. It is somebody saying what Jesus said, they all are of course, but the last one is truly offensive the switch so dramatic it is as if a fiend does the talking and not the person the previous authors take such care to get right. Compare with the synoptic gospels and the contrast cannot be more fantastic. Therefore flatly wrong.

John, is it? John and David Zebedee? they of "Lord, bring down fire and brimstone upon them" fame. I think it is him doing the talking. More likely some else entirely, someone who did not travel with Jesus. John of Patmos. Either John, it is not good. How dare he put those dreadful words in sweet Jesus' mouth. As reader I am offended. Deeply so.

It difficult of belief the councils include the book while discarding other good works. But they were trying to keep a whole civilization in line and this was the best they had to work with. Scare the living poop out of them. Most likely. The old good cop/bad cop routine.

It should be ripped out and tossed. Tossed in a pile of apocrypha if not a fire, apocrypha to apocrypha. Completely rejected.

You can do that you know. Just because some group of control freaks included the book to put the fear of God in readers, poor readers, does not mean you must accept it. Stick with the previous books, except for the crackpot Leviticus, I say, and you cannot go wrong with that. Too much attention is given that work tragically included. It wrecks the whole thing. Leaves a foul taste.

That is my opinion and Jesus told me alright then.

My nightmares are better than that, more informative, more useful. My dreams more revealing than that weird book. That there is some seriously twisted crap. It is not to be considered. I conclude John was a kook. So probably not the apostle. I don't know how Jesus put up with him if it was him. And I bet he is cross with what is done with his teachings in that last and worst of all books.

Eric the Fruit Bat said...

Professor Ehrman says that the Book of Revelation is one example of the apocalypse genre which was popular at the time and they've got lots of other stories along the same lines.

From the lecture discs I've been listening to that seems to be the standard view among scholars.

That and the whole thing is an allegory to the prevailing geopolitics of the period.

Something like like.

Oh, and Jesus claimed the apocalypse would occur within the lifespan of people who were alive at the present. What's that? 80 years or so?

I saw a bumper sticker the other day: "It's been over 2000 years and He's not coming back."

I though that was kind of funny, although totally unnecessary.

A retort to those "WARNING: In case of rapture this vehicle will be unmanned" bumper stickers, is my best guess.

Fr Martin Fox said...

Chip:

Thanks for your commentary on the Book of Revelation, seriously! Even though I obviously disagree, I enjoyed what you said.

FWIW, I think "red letter" editions are a bad idea. (And I think there are variations of that, where other sections are printed in other colors.) One problem is the implication that some words of Scripture are to be focused on more than others.

And, as far as the Book of Revelation, I won't surprise anyone when I say it's a badly misunderstood book.

And it's probably the hardest book of the Bible to penetrate. This is because the apocalyptic style in which it is written requires not just linguistic translation (i.e., from Greek to English), it also requires "translation" of the genre and symbolism. And most of what anyone says about the Book of Revelation, whether expert or not, messes it up.

Here's one way to penetrate it. Realize that most of the book presents reality on two levels. Think of a play, in which you see inside a house, and you see actors on the lower level, and actors on the higher level.

In Revelation, the scenes shift back and forth between heaven and earth. The contrast is important. On earth, there is war, suffering, conflict, persecution, all arising from greed and ambition, culminating in the anti-Christ and the "beast" and all that. And there is much drama about the ambitions of the bad guys and whether they will prevail. And heaven keeps sending warnings and corrections, growing more and more severe, and yet nothing seems to turn folks back to sanity.

Meanwhile, in heaven, everything is peaceful. And yet it seems God is too passive. "How long, O Lord?" the martyrs ask. "Soon."

Since those of us who read this are on earth, we tend to get engulfed by the earthly perspective. And we worry about the outcome.

(And remember, the book was written for Christians who were being persecuted, and indeed wondered about it all.)

Well, when the time is right, God intervenes, and the matter is sorted quickly and -- for God -- effortlessly.

Don't know if that helps.

Paddy O said...

Yeah, Revelation is part of a genre, the Western of the time. All very stylized. Intertestamental (between Old and New) it caught on.

The OT Pseudepigrapha (which I own in 2 rather heavy volumes) collects a number of these.

Try The Book of Enoch, for example.

"whole thing is an allegory to the prevailing geopolitics"

The trouble is there's big disagreement whether it's just that. A lot of Bible interpretation involves seeing the intentional multi-level intent. It's often framed, and originally understood, as operating as both immediate and cosmic. There's a lot of self-similarity across scales thing going on in almost every book.

Here's NT Wright on Apocalypse.

Paddy O said...

I was responding to Eric, but thinks that Fr Fox put it better.

It's worth noting that Revelation as genre is missed by almost all Christians too, which leads to a lot of popular and unfortunate pseudo-scholarship/entertainment.

sakredkow said...

Fascism is a pretty strong word for the free movement of the marketplace. If you favor a deregulated marketplace I don't see how it makes sense to call these business decisions fascism.

Fight against it and stop it? What's your plan? Or are you just saying words to feel better?

Fr Martin Fox said...

Paddy, Eric:

I'd give Bishop Wright his due, I think he's a pretty good scholar, although that's hard to sustain when he goes so goofy on women's ordination. His book on the resurrection was masterful.

But Ehrman? I don't say this lightly, but he seems like an utter dimbulb. He claims (with a straight face) that there's nothing in Matthew, Mark and Luke that shows Jesus is divine.

Well, that is just breathtaking in its ignorance. Astounding. Embarrassing.

Chip S. said...

phx--If we consider fascism to be a deadly disease for the body politic, then this sort of behavior can be viewed as a precursor, as being HIV+ is to developing AIDS. So how about "proto-fascism"?

"Extortion" is simpler, but lacks context.

Aridog said...

I wasn't going to post this, it's just more Aridog verbosity...however, with the comments preceding, here goes...you have a scroll wheel if you need it :)....

I've always considered the Book of Revelation to be wholly allegorical, which may identify me as "Captain Obvious." And that's okay. I think Revelation serves a purpose, just as the Apocrypha does, when availabe to readers. I'd not want either withdrawn by the dictate of some vested scholars.
Of the Bibles I have read all or part of, (mainly the Vulgate, the King James, and the Dartmouth) I'd say the Darmouth Bible, an abridgement of the King James version, was the most helpful because it includes the the Apocrypha and is supplmented with notes relating to place, time and custom in history that include Judaic, Catholic, Protestant references. I am Catholic now with strong afinity to Judaism.

I've also read almost everything Mary Baker Eddy
(aka Mary Baker Glover) wrote and found most of it intriguing, if not gospel. I also have the biography of Pope John Paul II in my bookcase in the "due to be read next" space. Guess I'm lagging and procrastinating, given he's now a Saint. Never very religious myself, I have always found religion interesting. Wherever found, religion reflects a universal yearning to be whole. And pure. Which may not be possible. The merit is in the trying, stumbling is a given.

I was impressed with what Buddhism I exeprienced in Asia and a simple difference between west and east. Confucianism was equally intriguing. In the west we presume the right to kill, and debate the means. In the east the debate is whether to kill, the means secondary. Their laws on homicide reflect that difference. I'm not going to judge which path is rightous...except to suggest the Eastern path leads to subjugation quicker than the Western path. That revelation was between two slightly (?) makkoli innebriated soldiers, me, a US Army Sergeant, and a ROK Army Corporal. I think we solved the whole world's problems that night in the dark on the DMZ. Too bad we can't remember most of it.

I have no difficulty conflating Pestilence, War, Famine, and Death with the legend of the Seventh Son. And why not? I, and some others here, have expereinced two of them up close and personal. I'd like to see a healer among us. Again.

And make no mistake, I also apprediate Chip Ahoys' take on Revelation. He may be right. It is disturbing. Especially if you read it literally. However, sometimes you must have disturbed mind to faintly grasp the conflagration around you at times, to give "features" to its elements, when you are subject to it....no other take works. I doubt mine will ever be the same. You just file it away and move forward and do your best.

sakredkow said...

"Extortion" is simpler, but lacks context.

I'm good with extortion. "Proto-fascism" is just as ridiculous as "fascism".

Chip S. said...

I don't think "pro to-fascism" is ridiculous. But I suppose it depends on what you think "fascism" means.

I don't think of "fascism" as exclusively referring to a political regime, but to a political mindset. It's the counterpoint to (classical, at least) liberalism, as represented by the famous (tho apocryphal) Voltaire "quote". Viewpoint suppression is clearly a big step toward tyranny, IMO.

What we clearly have are multiple cases in which an angry mob is trying to silence individuals whose views differ from those of the mob. If successful, it has the same effect as governmental suppression of views. In fact, if it's successful, there's no need for governmental suppression.

Are you aware that the infamous Hollywood blacklist was published by a private publication, and that it was privately owned studios that responded by not hiring blacklisted writers and actors? What term would you use for that sort of activity?

sakredkow said...

Viewpoint suppression is clearly a big step toward tyranny, IMO.

You have to qualify that IMO. Not all suppression of viewpoints is anything like fascism or tyranny - in many cases it's nothing more than free choice. Conflate the two at your peril.

sakredkow said...

We should all have the right to vote with our pocketbook, shouldn't we?

sakredkow said...

I didn't find the Hollywood blacklist anywhere near as offensive as the HUAC witch hunts.

Chip S. said...

Conflate the two at your peril.

I do understand the diff. b/w necessary and sufficient conditions. What I said is that viewpoint suppression is a big step toward tyranny. To say that it doesn't always result in tyranny doesn't refute what I said. People can avoid that by opposing viewpoint suppression.

Oh, and "at my peril"?

Call me Danger Man, I guess.

sakredkow said...

What I said is that viewpoint suppression is a big step toward tyranny. To say that it doesn't always result in tyranny doesn't refute what I said.

Sure, using that formula you can also say giving the government authority to throw criminals in prison is a big step towards tyranny. You really have to make some distinctions for it to be a meaningful warning.

What is wrong with people voting with their pocketbooks? Even organizing to do so? Assuming the government is a neutral bystander? This works for both sides unless I'm being dense.

Check on the "at your peril" stuff.

sakredkow said...

Just a heads up: Round 8 of the 2014 USA Chess Championship begins in a few minutes.

Chip S. said...

We should all have the right to vote with our pocketbook, shouldn't we?

This line of argument won't get you anywhere. Most of the cases we've been talking about involve clashes of claimed rights. The question is, what is desirable?

Your question suggests a bright line: Individuals should be allowed to decide who to deal with on the basis of their own personal beliefs. But groups should not demand that others conform to their beliefs.

So, e.g., Catholic bakers shouldn't have to provide cakes that say "Happy Abortion!", but the Catholic Church shouldn't lobby to prevent such cakes from being sold.

Seems nice and simple.

sakredkow said...

Great commentary from former US champ Yasir Seirawan, Jennifer Shahade and GM Maurice Ashley. As long as you know how the pieces move they explain what's going on very clearly.

The production values of the USA Chess Championship broadcast are the best in the world.

sakredkow said...

But groups should not demand that others conform to their beliefs.

Why shouldn't they? Why are you so judgey about people banding together to exercise their influence in a lawful manner?

sakredkow said...

They aren't really "demanding that others conform to their beliefs." They may be doing that but in effect their demands mean nothing - we're all free to exercise our choice in the matter.

What they're actually doing is making a choice for themselves in the free marketplace, and joining with others collectively to create an influence of scale. Just like businesses do themselves.

Chip S. said...

They may be doing that but in effect their demands mean nothing - we're all free to exercise our choice in the matter.

I hope you're just being disingenuous.

sakredkow said...

What do you mean? We all exercise our choices, and in the free marketplace there will be winners and there will be losers? Not sure why you think that's disingenuous.

sakredkow said...

Someone has a soulful musical taste at the US Championship.

Chip S. said...

Just a few minutes ago you wrote, "I'm good with extortion."

I thought you meant that as an endorsement of my comparison, but apparently you meant it as an endorsement of the practice.

And yes, discussions of ethics do tend to get "judgey". Sort of like 90% of your comments.

chickelit said...

I can't just phone in answers to Chip S, that's for sure.

chickelit said...

You can't either, phx.

sakredkow said...

Well it's not really extortion. Closer to extortion than fascism though.

Chip S. said...

Enjoy the chess match.

sakredkow said...

People boycott the tv networks all the time because they disagree with the values that fed to them through the media. What is wrong or ethically suspect with that? What you choose to economically boycott may be open to criticism but the mere practice of boycotts seems to me perfect consistent with our economic and political system. What could be more American?

sakredkow said...

Agreeing to call it "extortion" was a little disingenuous - not meant literally in a criminal sense.

Chip S. said...

I'll offer you one more perspective on this.

"Tolerance" is a type of arms limitation treaty. People who disagree on fundamentals can still live in peace by agreeing to limit the means by which they express their disagreement. Both sides may have all kinds of "rights", but they put aside some of those rights in pursuit of their own long-term interests.

You think it's perfectly fine to live in a world where people are constantly demanding that other people conform to their views, b/c they're all free to disregard the howling mobs outside their places of business. I don't.

It's hard enough finding a good barber w/o limiting the choice set to people w/ acceptable views on a range of non-haircut-related issues.

Chip S. said...

Here's a story about a guy whose actions were, AFAIK, completely w/in his rights:

A Pearl man who runs a political blog is accused of sneaking into a nursing home where U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran's wife is bedridden and photographing her, then posting the image in a video political "hit piece" on the internet.

I'm sure the guy acted out of a sincere belief that Thad Cochran should be defeated in the next election. I'm unaware of any laws that his actions violated, and physical violence was not involved. Yet, his actions are repellent--at the moment, anyway--b/c they violate the presumed rules of reasonable behavior in politics.

Until recently, demands that people be fired from their jobs b/c of their political views have been considered to be unreasonable. I agree w/ that, b/c it's an easily-drawn bright line.

sakredkow said...

"Tolerance" is a type of arms limitation treaty. People who disagree on fundamentals can still live in peace by agreeing to limit the means by which they express their disagreement. Both sides may have all kinds of "rights", but they put aside some of those rights in pursuit of their own long-term interests.

I'm completely in agreement. I'm personally not boycotting anyone at them moment. I don't usually do boycotts (weasel word inserts b/c my memory is not all that great).

My point was that people who disagree with us and who do use boycotts in the marketplace are not fascists or proto-fascists. They are capitalists.

sakredkow said...

Of course they often make terrible and often unethical choices. Heh, like that somehow never happens in the marketplace.

It seems to me you're doing a little more than your fair share of pearl clutching here.

Rabel said...

"I'm unaware of any laws that his actions violated, and physical violence was not involved."

"Madison Police arrested Clayton Thomas Kelly, 28, of Pearl on Friday night on a charge of exploitation of a vulnerable adult. He's being held on a $100,000 bond."

Mississippi code:

Definitions:

""Exploitation" means the illegal or improper use of a vulnerable adult or his resources for another's profit or advantage, with or without the consent of the vulnerable adult, and includes acts committed pursuant to a power of attorney."

It might be difficult to make the "profit or advantage" requirement stick, but he's still looking at a range of charges related to entering a private room in a private facility without permission and taking photos.

He's going down.

Trooper York said...

"He's going down."

Really?

Maybe Oprah should do a reality show about him.

Trooper York said...

I mean that's what the people want. Not committed Christians. They need to be shunned.

It's a sick world and it is getting sicker.