Saturday, November 23, 2013

"Brightest Explosion In the Universe Ever Seen Defies Astronomy Theories"

"The really cool thing about this GRB (gamma-ray burst) is that because the exploding matter was traveling at [nearly] the speed of light, we were able to observe relativistic shocks," study co-author Giacomo Vianello, a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University in California, said in a statement. "We cannot make a relativistic shock in the lab, so we really don't know what happens in it, and this is one of the main unknown assumptions in the model. These observations challenge the models and can lead us to a better understanding of physics."

Live Science beta

20 comments:

Eric the Fruit Bat said...

No explosion defied anything.

I'm getting sick and tired of this shit.

However, on a more positive note, when even science-based websites are overselling news reports using the same blather template they use to sell Kim Kardashian's latest baby bump, it would seem that the race to the bottom is just about over.

Michael Haz said...

Shorter version: "We do not know what the hell happened, but something went boom/flash, then disappeared into blackness. We put a pic of it on pinterest."

Michael Haz said...

"And we aren't alluding to Nancy Sinatra's career."

rhhardin said...

Likewise, if you want to detect gravity waves with a series of satellites, call it a gravity wave observatory rather than a gravity wave detector.

Funds are easier to get.

Not that it isn't interesting but spin is spin.

rhhardin said...

That they have models in the PR is not a good sign.

Shouting Thomas said...

That was, in fact, one of Hillary's farts.

She and the lesbos were playing with matches.

AllenS said...

Are you sure it wasn't the Democrats using the nuclear option?

rhhardin said...

The previous gamma ray shocks scientists here.

I think there's one about to blow that's possibly aimed at us in the Crab Nebula. If it goes, we go.

Which is what I was actually goodling for.

rhhardin said...

Ah, here it is.

Eta Carinae.

Mumpsimus said...

The gamma radiation is emitted in a narrow cone from each pole of the collapsing star. So even if Eta Carinae goes boom, chances that one of its poles is pointed right at us are pretty small.

ricpic said...

Crab Nebula? Isn't that an entirely different galaxy than the Milky Way we're out on the edge of?

XRay said...

Good memory, Hardin. Hadn't thought of USS Clueless in quite some time. Still miss it though.

Revenant said...

All the nebulas we know about are in our galaxy. Other galaxies used to be CALLED nebulas until we realized what they really were.

deborah said...

I realize that light years are distance measurements, but how long will it take 9000 ly to reach us?

Sixty Grit said...

Hmm, traveling at the speed of light, that should take about 17 trillion dollars, give or take.

deborah said...

Tell me about it.

Hagar said...

If it happened 8,999 years ago, about a year.

deborah said...

So, by the time we see it, we have a year, if the cone is aimed at us?

Mumpsimus said...

No, when we see it, it's here. Visible light, like gamma rays, is a frequency of radiation. It all moves at the same speed.

deborah said...

At least it'll be quick. Thanks, Mumps :)