Saturday, July 23, 2016

Scale

The Relative Size of All Known Objects in the Universe from dataisbeautiful

Universcale

"In this presentation, you can see the relative sizes of objects arranged on a single scale. This lets you grasp the sizes of things that you cannot compare side by side in the real world. Today's electron microscopes and astronomical telescopes reveal objects that were invisible to people of the past. How is your grasp of the sizes of such things?"

"Universcale lets you see and understand the relative size of the full range of known objects in our universe."

21 comments:

Lem said...

This reminded me of a post Freeman Hunt did about 3 years ago.

It might take a while to load the visual, but it's worth it I think. At least it was for me.

Patience.

Guildofcannonballs said...

http://money.visualcapitalist.com/all-of-the-worlds-money-and-markets-in-one-visualization/

Same vein.

chickelit said...

The proton is the smallest thing ranked on that scale. I blogged about how easy protons have become to visualize using MRI here.

john said...

I dozed off between 10^23 and 10^14 meters. Which is pretty much what one needs to do for that kind of space travel.

And dream of Sigourny Weaver. In her underwear.

john said...

So Pluto is now chopped liver? That is so unfair.

I'm live blogging.

john said...

As opposed to Everest, Mt Fuji is balanced on the point of a pin.

john said...

Imagine a spherical ostrich.

john said...

That's a very anglocentric outline of a man, with no penis evn. I wonder if this was done in England.

Lem said...

I thought Jupiter was bigger than Saturn.

How could have been wrong about that was never tested in conversation apparently for as long as I had that erroneous impression is something to be thankful for.

You might think it's a little thing.

Lem said...

Is it the rings that makes Saturn larger?

Trooper York said...

If Titus was awake he would demand that he probe Uranus.

Evi L. Bloggerlady said...

Troop, Titus claims not to be into that.

So what is the scale of Hillary Clinton conscience, BTW?

Chip Ahoy said...

Mt. Fuji was visible from our font porch in Momote Village. A very beautiful volcano. And when you get up there, it's BIG!

Evi L. Bloggerlady said...

Mt Fuji is gorgeous

Lem said...

I wander if the apparent symmetry of mount Fuji has something to do with the Japanese sense of aesthetic.

Sixty Grit said...

Mt. St. Helens was a conical volcano, once, then not, then again, rinse repeat. It was called "The Mt. Fuji of America", but by the time I got there in 1984 it more closely resembled Hiroshima.

chickelit said...

Evi L. Bloggerlady said...Troop, Titus claims not to be into that.

He also claims to into a lot of things, so consider the source.

chickelit said...

I've long admired the nearly perfect bilateral symmetry of the Collegiate Peaks in Colorado.

AprilApple said...

Chickel - touching on my favorite subject (thank you)
That's one mountain!

AprilApple said...

Princeton.

AprilApple said...

http://coloradoguy.com/mt-yale.htm

yale has similar visuals