Wednesday, September 23, 2015

"He's survived by his family and Yogisms"

10 comments:

AllenS said...

"It ain't over, until it's over."

And, now it's over.

Thanks for the memories.

ndspinelli said...

One of the best memories of my father was in 1977 taking him to the hotel in KC where the Yankees stayed. Yogi was just hanging in the lobby and I led my old man up to Yogi to shake his hand. It was obvious in person, as well as on TV, that Yogi was an introvert. But, he smiled as my dad shook his hand telling Yogi he had been a Yankee fan all his life. A few pleasantries followed. Nothing spectacular, no Yogisms. But, my old man grew up in a family that worshiped Joe D. My grandfather was an Italian immigrant who fell in love w/ baseball and the Yankees. He always had the Yankee games on the radio in his restaurant and would stop working when Joe D came to bat. For many Italians, Yogi was the next Italian hero. The man could wake up on Christmas morning and hit line drives. My old man took me to a game in the 60's. I saw Berra hit a pitch that was forehead level and tomahawk it into the right field seats. RIP.

Lem said...

"Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't come to yours."

One of his reported Yogism

virgil xenophon said...

@ndspinelli/

Berra was famous for being the best "Bad pitch" hitter in baseball. I once saw him lunge across the plate to hit a pitch a good two feet outside the strike zone for a stand-up triple, lol..

virgil xenophon said...

The Yankees have lost their "one-two punch" with the death of Berra. Remember, before "Yogisms" there was also "Stengelese" As a combo they COULD.NOT.BE.TOPPED.

Methadras said...

RIP Yogi. I never met ya, but I'm glad I did. :D

Methadras said...

Yogi, wherever you are, if the fat lady is singing, tell her to put a sock in it.

Can Of Cheese for Hunter said...

“When you come to a fork in the road take it.”

Jim in St Louis said...

Mr Berra was a St Louis boy (like Joe Garagiola) and he is much loved on "The Hill" where every restaurant and deli has a "Yogi" on the menu.

He always told people that he never said half of the things that he did. Which is a Yogism all of its own.

Meade said...

"Baseball has been a great part of my life. To me, it's still the greatest game there is. It's given me and countless others the opportunity to show what you can do, no matter who you are.

In 1947, my first year in the majors, Jackie Robinson and Larry Doby also came in. They didn't have it easy. But they changed the game for good, and for the good of our country. They made the game about equality and respect, the way it should be.

That's why I'm proud and thrilled that Major League Baseball and Athlete Ally are making baseball even fairer, and better. Their alliance is in the spirit of what we teach young people at our Museum & Learning Center. And it's in the spirit of our Museum partnership with Athlete Ally that began with our exhibit "Allyship" last year, highlighting major moments in the struggle for equality in sports.

Respect the game. Respect others. That's what I always learned in sports. Treat everyone the same. That's how it should be. The inclusion and acceptance for the LGBT community is no different."