Saturday, September 3, 2016

The Irritating Gentleman (1874)

16 comments:

chickelit said...

He cannot see her grief and tries to voice over it.

Adamsunderground said...

Teddy Roosevelt: Baby, your goth get up sets my bull moose party ablaze! How about you and me head back to the dining car and sup on raw oysters, washed down with splash of Dr. Elijah's Potency Tonic/Steam Engine Cleaner?

Evi L. Bloggerlady said...

Teddy was a gentleman. He would not intrude on a young lady like that and not catch the cues. Plus he was only 16 years old when this painting was done.

Adamsunderground said...

That lady's pool cues need chalking, and hustler Teddy's a-stalking the felt.

I Can Help by Billy Swann

Trooper York said...

That's Joe Bidens grandfather.

Adamsunderground said...

No Biden ever bid his time long enough to hold a cigar when there's unmolested, pallid flesh about!

AprilApple said...

Know all about it.

AprilApple said...

In modern times, that jerk would feel my sharp elbow in his face. Ooops - did I do that?

bagoh20 said...

Phenomenal skill. I can't fully comprehend how someone can do that with paint and a brush. It seems like magic.

rhhardin said...

Think of how much worse it would be in airline seats.

Rhythm and Balls said...

Meade? Is that you!

Rhythm and Balls said...

Kind of a fancy painting to go on a handbag in 1874. The item actually looks surprisingly modern and would fit right in somewhere today.

ricpic said...

There is nothing like a dame!

Evi L. Bloggerlady said...

At first glance she looks pissed. In the bigger higher resolution image she looks like she has a tear in her eye. It changes the mood of the painting considerably.

chickelit said...

The original German title, Der lästige Kavalier, carries a bit of etymological nuance that I can't resist. First, the noun Kavalier is translated as "gentleman" when there is a perfectly fine German word for that: der Herr. Kavalier in this context means a "ladies man" or at least someone we might call cavalier. Secondly, the adjective lästige, doesn't really mean "irritating," but more "interminable, unending, boring."

Looking at his other works, Woltze seems to have been a sort of German Norman Rockwell. See for example his Ein Brief aus Amerika (A Letter from America).

rcocean said...

I don't know guys, I just saw a painting of a white canvas with a red dot in the middle at the local 'modern' art museum.

It was like, super deep, and interesting. Or so, the guidebook told me.