Saturday, March 30, 2019

Oddly dressed Euros

In this case it is a French woman singing Italian lyrics set to music written by a German composer who lived in England. It is lovely, no matter how odd her clothing is. She has much better dentition than dead Karl.


And the crowd goes crazy!

15 comments:

ricpic said...

Wow! What a voice. Does this mean I should stop singing in the shower? Nah.

Sixty Grit said...

She has a great voice, but she made some poor sartorial choices that day, just sayin'.

rhhardin said...

I heard a lute that they finally showed. The trouble with lutes in ensembles is that they're too quiet and so are played at maximum volume, which gives no control over the tone they emit.

Sixty Grit said...

I like the lines played on the lute - ascending or descending figures played in the gaps, as it were. Sweet sounding music, for sure.

I know - slap a pickup on that son-of-a-gun, plug it into an amp and crank up the volume! Electrified lute!

chickelit said...

Händel had umlauts? Who knew?

Sixty Grit said...

Georg Friedrich Händel, or "according to baptismal records in Halle's parish church, the Lutheran Marktkirche Unser Lieben Frauen. The records of that church also show that the family name was spelled on various occasions at least four other ways: Hendel, Händeler, Hendeler and Hendtler, but most commonly Händel. In Italy he spelled it Hendel, as it is pronounced in German. From the time he arrived in England, however, he consistently signed his name as George Frideric Handel". You know those whacky Germans and their umlauts.

Sixty Grit said...

Oh yeah, I have also seen his name spelled "Haendel", which seems to be a French thing.

MamaM said...

Upon mention from another, I stepped into the church of baseball on Netflix and am now wondering if wearing the Great Hat while singing encourages a feeling of distinction, lift and extension, similar in result to a ploy of encouraging the pitcher wearing garters and breathe out of his left eyelid?

It certainly provides an external point of focus.

Sixty Grit said...

Shall I post the "conference on the mound" scene? "We are dealing with a lot of stuff here" and "Candlesticks always make a nice gift" - that movie has really stuck with me through the years, not only because I enjoyed going to that ballpark (and still drive past it once in a while) but because of the great writing. Funny danged ol' movie, just sayin'.

chickelit said...

“Oh yeah, I have also seen his name spelled "Haendel", which seems to be a French thing.”

Putting an “e” after any vowel deprived of its umlaut is standard best practice for German-to-English transliteration. I shudder to think what the French would invent.

Sixty Grit said...

Then I went back to my post and noticed that's how it's spelled in the supertitle. I knew I had seen that somewhere!

ndspinelli said...

Of course, the mound scene concludes w/ the, "Let's get two!" Having coached baseball for 3 decades, I uttered that phrase countless times. However, to varying degrees, after seeing this great flick, I had to stifle a laugh when I did.

I called my granddaughter on lollygagging this morning and she now says it intelligibly.

Sixty Grit said...

Ron Shelton knew what he was writing about and it shows in that movie. While my love of the game has evaporated I still enjoy the memories that movie evokes. As I say - even the town where it was filmed has changed beyond recognition, but that's the way of the world. Costner was very good in that movie, not sure he was ever better. He was certainly a darned sight worse, that's for sure.

ndspinelli said...

Costner was a ballplayer, that was obvious and gave him credibility.

Sixty Grit said...

"Get out of your head!" he says in the voiceover walking up to the plate - that is brilliant.

"Anything traveling that fast should have a stewardess on it!" Funny stuff.