Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Forbidden Thoughts

Forbidden Thoughts

I'm not sure what to expect with this. But science fiction is supposed to be transgressive and this promises to ride that line.  I know several of the world class authors (in an imaginary internet friend sort of way.)  I bought it through Lem's link.  Check it out!

13 comments:

Synova said...

I actually don't know if you use the link in the post if it uses the website portal. It ought to, right? Anyone know for certain?

Lem said...

No. I recommend going through the portal, just to be sure.

Thanks Synova, for reminding people to use it.

chickelit said...

Synova wrote I know several of the world class authors (in an imaginary internet friend sort of way.)

"Chromium Oxide" is an intriguing pseudonym. Do you know him/her? Chromium oxide intrigues me because it's so indefinite and could refer to any one of several different chromium oxides. I'll bet bags could relate.

chickelit said...

That reminded me to ask: Do any of those authors write with a chemical slant?

Synova said...

I actually have no idea at all who chromium oxide is. Apparently it's green.

chickelit said...

Apparently it's green.

Cr(III) oxide. There's a red one too: Cr(VI) oxide. CrO3 is an intense cherry red. There's an orange chromium oxide too. Other chromium salts are yellow, blue and purple. The element was given it's name (chromos = color, cf. kodachrome film) because it exhibits so many colors -- more than any other element.

Evi L. Bloggerlady said...

Kodachroooome! Now I've got that Simon & Garfunkle song playing in my head!

chickelit said...

Earworm!

chickelit said...

I'd buy "Forbidden Thoughts" just to read what Chromium Oxide writes but I don't do Kindle.

chickelit said...

Ah, here's "Chrome Oxide's" Amazon page: link.

I was reading too much into his name. "Chrome Oxide" is meaningless in a scientific sense. I wonder if he knows that? I wonder also whether it helps or hurts to have scientific training as a science fiction writer. Asking for a friend.

Eric the Fruit Bat said...

I listened to some lecture series on science fiction. It wasn't interesting. Don't recall whether I made it to the end. The guy actually seemed to care whether Star Wars should be classified as science fiction. That man sells a weird product. Oh well, he teaches at some college, somewhere, presumably for money, so good for him.

I'm probably going to bail on the Aquinas lectures today. Quite possibly this morning. Same deal. Not interesting. Of no practical use. I laughed out loud when the guy made some passing reference to William James and Pragmatism.

Will probably start the lecture series on dinosaurs. Not of much practical use but it's interesting subject matter. I've listened to it before. And I'm sure I'll make it all the way to the end, this time, as well. Because dinosaurs are awesome!

deborah said...

Reminded of the famous (very) short story "Harrison Bergeron," by Vonnegut. It's the future and the talented are forcibly handicapped so everyone is equal.

full text:

https://archive.org/stream/HarrisonBergeron/Harrison%20Bergeron_djvu.txt

Synova said...

chickelit, I don't know of any sci-fi writers who are chemists, though I don't know much. There seem to be quite a few who have a physics background and I tend to notice others who do earth sciences so I notice the geologists. I think that the field is wide open for some chemistry themed sci-fi. We've been sort of short of alien worlds lately (colonization is in the SJW doghouse) but it's been longer than that since alien worlds have felt alien. Room for some fun disaster stuff too, like "add this catalyst to terraform Titan... opps... wrong vial..." What can you do with world-wide methane seas? I sure wouldn't know.