Monday, June 13, 2016

KLEM FM


Lyrics after the jump

The Man Comes Around

And I heard, as it were, the noise of thunder:
One of the four beasts saying: "Come and see." And I saw.
And behold, a white horse.

There's a man goin' 'round takin' names.
An' he decides who to free and who to blame.
Everybody won't be treated all the same.
There'll be a golden ladder reaching down.
When the man comes around.

The hairs on your arm will stand up.
At the terror in each sip and in each sup.
Will you partake of that last offered cup,
Or disappear into the potter's ground.
When the man comes around.

Hear the trumpets, hear the pipers.
One hundred million angels singin'.
Multitudes are marching to the big kettle drum.
Voices callin', voices cryin'.
Some are born an' some are dyin'.
It's Alpha's and Omega's Kingdom come.

And the whirlwind is in the thorn tree.
The virgins are all trimming their wicks.
The whirlwind is in the thorn tree.
It's hard for thee to kick against the pricks.

Till Armageddon, no Shalam, no Shalom.
Then the father hen will call his chickens home.
The wise men will bow down before the throne.
And at his feet they'll cast their golden crown.
When the man comes around.

Whoever is unjust, let him be unjust still.
Whoever is righteous, let him be righteous still.
Whoever is filthy, let him be filthy still.
Listen to the words long written down, When the man comes around.

Hear the trumpets, hear the pipers.
One hundred million angels singin'.
Multitudes are marchin' to the big kettle drum.
Voices callin', voices cryin'.
Some are born an' some are dyin'.
It's Alpha's and Omega's Kingdom come.

And the whirlwind is in the thorn tree.
The virgins are all trimming their wicks.
The whirlwind is in the thorn tree.
It's hard for thee to kick against the pricks.

In measured hundredweight and penny pound.
When the man comes around.

And I heard a voice in the midst of the four beasts,
And I looked and behold: a pale horse.
And his name, that sat on him, was Death.
And Hell followed with him.

15 comments:

Sixty Grit said...

I posted this song in a comment not long ago - not complaining, mind you, I really like it. It encapsulates some of the things I went through earlier this year. I am truly glad to be here and glad that summer is here, too.

Sixty Grit said...

I still have a problem with "father hen" - they are known as roosters.

chickelit said...

I posted this song in a comment not long ago - not complaining, mind you, I really like it. It encapsulates some of the things I went through earlier this year. I am truly glad to be here and glad that summer is here, too.

Should I send you the "melting rainbow ice cube"? It might look nice in one of your bowls as a prop especially on a bright sunny day.

chickelit said...

I like the sound of the piano -- it reminds me of my mother playing an old stripped out player piano we had in our basement. As a young kid, I used to sit halfway down the basement steps and watch her when she had her back turned. She must have been about 30 then.

chickelit said...

Sixty Grit said...I still have a problem with "father hen" - they are known as roosters.

A father hen is different than a rooster. A father hen is like a Reverend Wright or an Obama. Someone who preaches to, but, is controlled by women.

ndspinelli said...

Sixty, I'm glad you're here as well. Although, I don't think summer would be all that attractive to me in your neck o' the woods. Spring and Fall would be my cup o' tea.

Lem said...

Thanks for posting this Chick.

I've been busy trying to reinstall iTunes on my PC. I was afraid I was going to run into trouble and sure enough. I've been getting 3 error messages when trying to install it.

I posted my troubles to both community board sites... Apples and Microsoft.

I came across a fix but the fix applied to windows 7, I've updated to windows 10. I'm afraid to try it an mess up the computer.

Evi L. Bloggerlady said...

I like this song. It is good to listen to every six months or so...

Lem said...

It's biblical. If Paddy O were here, he tell us about it.

Sixty Grit said...

Mr. Lit, if you are offering, I am accepting. It is an awesome piece, as usual, and I would be proud to put it out with my wares.

We had communicated about Maraschino cherries - I ended up buying some on eBay for under two dollars, delivered, from China. It looked like kind of a sketchy deal, but I figured that I could take a chance - and what do you know - within two weeks of placing the order I got a package all the way from the land of the ChiComs. Too bad the product sucks, but it gets the point across.

Of course when I mention that it is a metaphor, well, that usually stops the discussion right in its tracks.

And summer around here is awesome. It hasn't hit 100 for a couple of years, so Anthropormorphized Global Cooling is working out quite nicely, thank you. You got June Gloom? It is that time of year, after all.

I saw a large snapping turtle laying her eggs Sunday evening while out on a walk - now that is one egg laying creature that needs to be respected - father hen? Not so much.

The best piano I ever owned was an Estey, which had the player movement stripped out, but still had all the sliding doors to let the sound escape. Awesome action, great tone, and one heck of an all around instrument.

MamaM said...

While it would undoubtably be good to hear from Paddy O on any topic, a comprehensive description/explanation of the roots and Biblical connections can be found here

In the early 1970s, however, Bible study became “an important part” of his life. Cash befriended, among others, Billy Graham. According to Steve Turner, “Graham … was intrigued by Cash’s ability to be candid about his faith and yet find acceptance with sections of society that traditionally were cynical about Christianity.” His view of the Bible was deeply influenced by the Dispensational Evangelicalism that Graham represented. In 1986, the man whose stage attire had gained him the name, “The Man in Black,” wrote a novel about St Paul, The Man in White. In the introduction, Cash writes: “I believe the Bible, the whole Bible, to be the infallible, indisputable Word of God.” Such a statement, however, does not do justice to his Bible. As we shall see, his ability to hold disparate elements together—gospel/murder, candid faith/popularity—is also clearly evident in his statements about his Bible...In his 1997 autobiography, Cash describes Bible study as disciplined enquiry: “I start most of my mornings with coffee, CNN, and then the Bible, and that sets me up for a good day.” His methodology is clear:

"What I really enjoy is the Bible. I love to set myself a test, give myself something to study. I find a passage I don’t quite understand and chase it down in the concordance and the chain references until I learn what it means, or at least what the best-versed scholars have been able to interpret it as meaning."

This hint of limitation echoed again when Cash reminisces about his studies in the 1970s. He noted that “the experience was both exciting and humbling; I learned just enough to understand that I knew almost nothing.” It is perhaps no surprise that Cash’s Bible could also be described differently at this point: “Once I learned what the Bible is—the inspired word of God (most of it anyway)—the writing became precious to me, and endlessly intriguing.”


As for Sixty, I too am glad he and his chairs of bowlies (to use another turned phrase) is still around!

Sixty Grit said...

Thanks, MamaM = I really appreciate that. I am glad to be here and glad that people like you are here and supportive of me.

This is what Johnny Cash's daughter Rosanne had to say about her father - I found it fascinating. Johnny was another American original the likes of which we won't see again.

Lem said...

Thank you MamaM.

Lem said...

I got a promising lead on the iTunes install errors Chick.

I was surprised how quickly somebody at that board got back to me.

chickelit said...

Lemme know where to send it, 60. My work could use the Southern exposure.